Discrete choice experiments

Does attribute order influence attribute-information processing in discrete choice experiments?

The existing empirical evidence shows that both contingent valuation and discrete choice experiment (DCE) methods are susceptible to various ordering effects. However, very few studies have analysed attribute-ordering effects in DCEs, and no study …

Including opt-out options in discrete choice experiments: Issues to consider

Providing an opt-out alternative in discrete choice experiments can often be considered to be important for presenting real-life choice situations in different contexts, including health. However, insufficient attention has been given to how best to …

Using geographically weighted choice models to account for the spatial heterogeneity of preferences

In this paper, we investigate the use of geographically weighted choice models for modelling spatially clustered preferences. We argue that this is a useful way of generating highly‐detailed spatial maps of willingness to pay for environmental …

Spatial heterogeneity of willingness to pay for forest management

The paper investigates the spatial heterogeneity of public's preferences for the implementation of a new country-wide forest management and protection program in Poland. Spatial econometric methods and high resolution geographical information system …

Disentangling the influence of knowledge on attribute non-attendance

We seek to disentangle the effect of knowledge about an environmental good on respondents' propensity to ignore one or more attributes on the choice cards in a discrete choice experiment eliciting people's preferences for increased protection of …

Learning, fatigue and preference formation in discrete choice experiments

While the repeated nature of discrete choice experiments is advantageous from a sampling efficiency perspective, patterns of choice may differ across the tasks, due, in part, to learning and fatigue. Using probabilistic decision process models, we …

Accounting for attribute‐level non‐attendance in a health choice experiment: Does it matter?

An extensive literature has established that it is common for respondents to ignore attributes of the alternatives within choice experiments. In most of the studies on attribute non-attendance, it is assumed that respondents consciously (or …

Elimination and selection by aspects in health choice experiments: Prioritising health service innovations

Priorities for public health innovations are typically not considered equally by all members of the public. When faced with a choice between various innovation options, it is, therefore, possible that some respondents eliminate and/or select …